Adwoa Aboah and Cara Delevingne are at The Bowery Hotel in New York City reminiscing about old times. Though Aboah, 25, can’t remember the first time she met Delevingne, 24, she does know one moment long ago when her friend made a lasting impression. “You were walking around on the street in London in a cardboard box,” Adwoa remembers. The two, then teen models, had just finished a day of castings when Delevingne found the box lying around, poked eyeholes in it, and put it on over her head. The prank totally killed.

Delevingne, of course, grew up in London. She’s from a prominent family: Her grandmother Jane was a lady-in-waiting to Princess Margaret. Though Delevingne studied drama in high school, she wound up following her older sister Poppy’s example and began modeling at 16. In 2011 an 18-year-old Delevingne landed her first major gig—walking Burberry’s fall runway—and by 2012 she’d been named Model of the Year at the British Fashion Awards. Over the next few years, she started trends (bushy brows), landed magazine covers (Vogue), and consistently ranked as one of the world’s top-paid models (in 2014, 2015, and 2016). But Dele­vingne, in time, found her way back to her passion: acting. After making her debut in the 2012 film Anna Karenina, she landed a lead in Paper Towns in 2015 and joined a star-studded cast in 2016’s Suicide Squad. This summer she’s front and center in Luc Besson’s sci-fi film Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets.

But back to the box incident: What has endeared Delevingne to friends like Aboah, more than 40 million Instagram fans, and big brands like Rimmel London is her idiosyncratic personality. Her motto is “Embrace your weirdness.” She’ll stick out her tongue or cross her eyes in photos—and share them. Delevingne also isn’t afraid to get real: At 22 she talked about her attraction to both men and women. She dated musician Annie Clark (stage name St. Vincent) for a year and a half, a relationship that taught her “what love was—real love.” In a rap battle with James Corden and Dave Franco, she joked, “I’ve hooked up with hotter girls than both of you combined.” And many women identify: “I love Cara Delevingne,” one fan wrote on Twitter. “Her openness about her sexuality…helped me accept myself.” Last year she took on another stigmatized issue, depression, talking about her own diagnosis in a series of interviews. “Mental illness goes unseen,” she said, “but I don’t want it to be unheard.

Delevingne’s feminism goes deeper than words: She knows that many of her fans are teen girls, and she wants to break down barriers for them. She chose Valerian in part because of how her character, Laureline, a special operative tasked with saving the universe from a dark force, is represented. She goes headfirst into battle and saves her partner, Valerian, as much as he saves her. Delevingne is also hosting a girl-power docuseries with global sports brand Puma this summer, releasing a ­coming-of-age novel about teenhood this fall, and working with the U.N. Foundation’s Girl Up campaign, recently visiting Uganda to advocate for girls’ education. Shattering barriers? Embracing authenticity? Saying what she thinks? That’s the Delevingne Doctrine. She tells Aboah all about it, starting with some in-the-vault memories.

ADWOA ABOAH: What’s the most fun we’ve ever had together?
CARA DELEVINGNE: When we went to see Kelis at Glastonbury. We lost everyone—

ADWOA: And we found ourselves in the dance field at Kelis.
CARA: Or driving to Burning Man, our first time. We had no idea where we were going. The girl who drove was pregnant and blind.

ADWOA: She wasn’t wearing her glasses, was she? What I’ve realized is a lot of our first times have been together.
CARA: The first time we had sex—I’m joking. Kidding!

ADWOA: That’s not real. [Laughs.] We haven’t had sex. What do people get wrong about you and me?
CARA: Everything? Nothing. I don’t know. I tend not to dwell on the things people say. I’ve learned how bad that is for your well-being.

ADWOA: [People call us] “model best friends,” but we were friends before. What I’ve always been grateful for in our friendship is that we expect absolutely nothing from each other, just friendship.
CARA: You get paranoid that people are going to make friends with you for a reason, that they want something from you. But never have I ever thought anything other than that we love each other.

ADWOA: Yeah, exactly. [My question list says] you made the transformation from modeling to acting a few years ago. How did it feel?
CARA
: I hate this question. The word transformation is odd.

ADWOA: I bet you do. I always have people go, “So you’re acting now?” But actually I went to university for it. It feels like, “You once again think I’m some dumb model that now wants to be an actress.”
CARA: Exactly, right. I always say, modeling is something I do, whereas acting feels more like what I [am]. I have felt better than I felt in years, and that’s purely from doing what I love. Especially because, while I’ve been doing this film [the upcoming Life in a Year], I’ve been sober. Being completely clean and clearheaded has been so helpful with getting into character.

Full interview: glamour.com




The Delevingne girls talk about tough childhood and reveal how close they really are

The Delevingne sisters have spoken about their close bond — and revealed just how far they would go for one another.


In their first interview as a trio, model and actress Cara joked that if her elder siblings Poppy and Chloe killed someone, “I would help bury the body”.

The sisters spoke to PORTER magazine about the difficulties they faced when they were younger. Their mother, Pandora, 56, struggled with heroin addiction before they were born and was later diagnosed as bipolar.

Cara, 24, slept in Poppy’s bed for years as a child and said that both her sisters helped to bring her up.

Poppy, 30, who is also a model, said: “We have all learned that addiction and mental illnesses are illnesses and I think a lot of people overlook that it is a chemical imbalance; it’s like cancer, a sickness and people need to see it as that. So when people ask me, ‘Are you angry with your mum?’ I’m like, ‘No there is nothing to be angry about’.”

She added: “There were tricky times. I was 12 when it all started happening, which is the time you really need a mum — getting your period, wanting to know what sex is about. Cara was six years younger. She slept in my bed for years. She would literally twine her body around mine when I tried to sleep. To have each other was just so, so vital.”

Cara, who has branched out into acting on top of a hugely successful modelling career, said of her sisters: “Oh my God, it’s incredible to have these two. I don’t know what I would do without them, it would be horrifying.

“We have been through everything together. They helped bring me up. They taught me my love of music. We used to do dance routines to the Spice Girls, which we still do.

“I wouldn’t ever want to imagine a world without Poppy and Chloe. Put it this way, if one of them killed someone I would help bury the body.”

Eldest sister Chloe, 32, a charity campaigner who has two children, added: “We are very lucky, the chemistry between us is kind of perfect.”

Poppy is following in Cara’s footsteps by going into acting, with roles this year in King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword and Kingsman: The Golden Circle.

She often seeks her younger sister’s advice, saying: “She is such a doer, Cara, she is so ambitious. She has always known what she wants and she’s a hustler. Sometimes I call her and I’m like, you need to help me hustle, and she is like, ‘Come on!’”

Source: standard.co.uk




The Week That Changed Cara Delevingne’s Life

Last week, I had one of the most incredible experiences of my life meeting South Sudanese refugees in Uganda. I was with Girl Up and UNHCR, the United Nations refugee agency, to learn more about the work UNHCR is doing to respond to the refugee crisis and help provide education for refugee girls. Girls forced out of their homes, girls who just want an education, girls who worry about being pressured to marry before they even hit puberty.

As a champion of Girl Up, the United Nations Foundation’s campaign to unite and empower girls around the world, I’m proud to raise awareness for their work providing thousands of refugees in Uganda and Ethiopia with access to education—but to see it in action, in the flesh, was moving beyond words.

Our week-long trip began with visits to refugee entry points in northern Uganda along the border of South Sudan. We actually walked across the same bridges as the 460,000 refugees (an average of 2,000 per day) who have entered Uganda in the last six months alone.

As we came back up from the river, we passed many people walking on foot, carrying all their belongings and children on their backs. Just thinking about how many people were doing that journey with so much stuff, and to be walking for weeks…you can’t comprehend it. Their strength is unparalleled. We talked with UNHCR partners and Ugandan government officials at the border who give refugees a hot meal, medical services, and transport to a settlement where they can begin to rebuild their lives again.

[…]
By Cara Delevingne


Read more: An exclusive travel diary from Uganda, where South Sudanese refugee girls want nothing more than to learn.




Cara is on cover of Cleo Singapore Magazine for January 2017. I’ve added scans to gallery:




When it comes to millennial style icons you can’t do much better than Cara Delevingne. The actress-model has always had fun expressing herself with clothes. Whether stepping out in her low-key off-duty wardrobe of trainers and tracksuits, or delivering red carpet sophistication at her latest premiere, Delevingne plays with fashion and the expectations of her audience. “I think it would be pretty funny if I was wearing what I wore on red carpets every day in my ball gowns,” joked Delevingne at this morning’s H&M World Trade Center grand opening. “I like the extremes of [fashion] and I love being comfortable and confident in what I’m wearing.”
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Delevingne’s confidence has allowed her to test out a variety of looks. Burberry trenches, couture gowns, and sleek suits make up a portion of her closet, but so do affordable finds from her travels and frequent trips to inexpensive, accessible stores. Always on a search for great basics, Delevingne makes H&M runs whenever she’s in need of a fashion fail-safe. “For me, it’s always about those staple pieces, a pair of black skinny jeans, or these wicked Japanese-style bomber jackets, things that you can wear with everything,” says Delevingne. “They have everything and they cater to everyone, which is the wonderful thing about H&M.”
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Though she’s known for those casual-chic looks, she was never a mall rat growing up in England where high street shopping is the norm. “I’d never been to a mall before I came to America, really. I think Westfield was probably the first one that I went to,” she says. (She admits to fondness for the accessibility and snack options.) “I love to shop so I end up spending and getting a lot more—it’s a great way to spend your day, especially when you’ve got the right food.”
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Even with her newfound mall appreciation, she remains unafraid when it comes to upping the glamour quotient for a big event. Going for a complete 180 in dramatic dresses from Alexander McQueen or Chanel, she approaches each new runway look as if it were its own role. “When I’m getting dressed up it definitely feels like there’s a part that I’m playing,” says Delevingne. She preps for her big nights with a little help from her pals. “I love getting ready with friends, putting music on, and dancing around as we’re getting glammed up—being comfortable is fun as well. . . You put on a tracksuit, or sneakers and just chill and watch a movie.”
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Recently, both sides of Delevingne’s persona have been on display. Moving seamlessly from the runway to high-profile roles in hits like Suicide Squad she’s had plenty of opportunities to showcase her style. Even with premieres, openings, parties, and the business of being a rising star, her focus remains on the big picture. “Ever since I was a kid I wanted to act, so I feel extremely grateful and lucky to have the opportunity to be working with my idols,” says Delevingne, who just wrapped the sci-fi thriller Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets with Luc Besson. “I just want to be able to carry on what I’m doing, inspiring young girls and giving back. Letting girls know that they can do anything they want if they set their minds to it and follow their dreams and never give up.”

Source: vogue.com